Research: Research Projects

Recommend/Submit Research Project

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The ability to recommended research topics and submit completed research projects/reports is provided as an information service to the Security Cooperation (SC) community. The information posted should be considered as opinion of the submitter unless otherwise stated and is not endorsed by DISCS, DSCA, or the Department of Defense.

Recommend Research Project

Click the Recommend/Submit Research Project button above to recommend a research project, and then in the email body provide a summary of the research project/task, along with your full name, organization, and your work telephone number.

Submit Completed Research Project

To submit a completed research project/report, click the Recommend/Submit Research Project button above, and then in the email body provide your full name, organization, work telephone number, and a brief abstract. Also, please provide a URL to the full article, or send it to us as an email attachment. All findings submissions must also be accompanied by an author vita, and a short abstract (generally 100 words or less). The finished product should be in electronic format as a .doc, .pdf, or .htm file. Zip files may also be used for large files, or authors may mail a CD to the Administrator at:

Defense Institute of Security Cooperation Studies
Building 52
2475 K Street
WPAFB Ohio 45433-7641

Completed Projects/Reports

E-IMET: Is It Accomplishing Its Human Rights Focus in Latin America?
Submitted By:
Ronald Harry Reynolds
Summary:
Furthering democratization, the Expanded International Military Education and Training Program (E-IMET) conducted by the U.S. Departments of State and Defense seeks to further human rights. Case studies evaluated El Salvador, Guatemala, and Nicaragua including a review of U.S. government and nongovernmental reports and budgets, and a survey of previous students who attended 8 different U.S. military-sponsored courses selected for their human rights focus from 1991-2000. Findings inconclusive, but offered encouraging results that E-IMET, as a part of the overall U.S. grant program, facilitates human rights initiatives. Attendees appear to be the right persons for the subject courses who subsequently return to upwardly mobile positions with opportunities to influence their country’s future policies.
Document:
E-IMET: Is It Accomplishing Its Human Rights Focus in Latin America?
The role of the Export Credit Agency in supporting arms transfers: a comparative analysis.
Submitted By:
Joseph Andrew Terrell
Summary:
In an environment of shrinking defense budgets and increased Chinese influence and investment in the developing world, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) seeks to identify ways to maximize security cooperation opportunities with existing funding streams, making these programs more affordable; foreign military sales are a major component of the U.S. security cooperation program portfolio. The world’s major arms exporters, with the exception of the U.S., rely exclusively on their respective national Export Credit Agency (ECA) to facilitate competitive, and at times concessional, financial arrangements in order to secure business for domestic arms exporters. This paper performs a comparative analysis of how the U.S. and other major arms exporting countries, particularly China, utilize their ECA to facilitate arms sales, making the recommendation that the U.S. should reevaluate how it currently employs the Export-Import Bank as a measure to increase affordability of arms sales for developing nations in the current competitive environment.
Document:
The role of the Export Credit Agency in supporting arms transfers: a comparative analysis.
US-Egyptian Relations since the Arab Spring: Balancing Interests and Values
Submitted By:
Dr. Vaughn P. Shannon, Ph.D and Joshua Cummins, M.A.
Summary:
The United States (U.S.) has had an important strategic relationship with Egypt since the Camp David Accords of 1978. As a bulwark against Soviet expansionism during the Cold War, the guarantor of safe passage through the Suez Canal, and signatory to Arab-Israeli peace on Israel’s western front, Egypt brought many advantages...
Document:
US-Egyptian Relations since the Arab Spring: Balancing Interests and Values
U.S. Security Cooperation in Foreign Policy: Looking Past Human Rights Paradigms
Submitted By:
Christopher Dias/James P. Toomey
Summary:
On February 24, 2014, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni signed an anti-homosexuality bill into law. In response, the Obama administration pulled approximately $6.4 million of foreign aid, which supported the Inter-Religious Council of Uganda (IRCU). The IRCU is an organization that publicly supports anti-gay legislation, yet has received millions of dollars in grants from the United States (US) to help fight HIV/AIDS. Nevertheless, and almost simultaneously, the Obama administration sent four special operations aircraft and additional special operation and service support troops to Uganda to continue international efforts linked to tracking down Joseph Kony and the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA). Observably, there are inconsistencies in American foreign policy rhetoric and foreign aid allocation to a state that has undermined the civil liberties and human rights of its citizens. The purpose of this article is to highlight a need for research, which the authors intend to pursue in the coming months. The follow-on project will serve two purposes. First, it is intended to generally test competing theories of international relations, including realism, liberalism, and constructivism, to determine which theory supports the current American policy practices concerning sub-Saharan Africa. Second, it further hopes to analyze which specific factors, human rights practices or strategic significance, influence our foreign aid allocation, more specifically, security cooperation efforts.
Document:
-- This document was previously available on the DISAM Journal Web site which has since been decommissioned --
Human Trafficking in the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region
Submitted By:
Hannah Collins
Summary:
It has been stated by President Obama and acknowledged by many world leaders that trafficking in persons is a form of modern slavery that violates human rights, country security, economies, and public health in every state (State 2014). For this reason, the United States has been playing an active role in combating human trafficking at home and abroad in an effort to protect U.S. interests, security, citizens, and allies. Human Trafficking is a complex system that encompasses a wide variety of behaviors and actions. The United States simply defines trafficking in persons as ‘The use of force, fraud, or coercion to compel a person to provide labor, services or commercial sex. This includes elements of recruiting, harboring, transportation, providing or obtaining a person for the purpose of exploitation.' The three most common forms of trafficking that are recognized by the U.S. include Labor Trafficking, Sex Trafficking, and Child Soldiering (Defense 2014).
Document:
-- This document was previously available on the DISAM Journal Web site which has since been decommissioned --
Considerations for the Future National Military Strategy
Submitted By:
Christopher Krolikowski
Summary:
Over the last twenty plus years, six different Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) have laid out a National Military Strategy (NMS) for the U.S. Military Services to use as a guide to fulfill the President’s National Security Strategy (NSS) and the Secretary of Defense’s National Defense Strategy (NDS). In addition, early in its existence, the NMS developed a secondary purpose. It evolved to become an unclassified document to communicate with the American people, rather than just being internal military guidance. All six previous documents published addressed the current and future strategic environment. But just as importantly, they all addressed the force planning and resource allocation (sometimes with even recommendations to the Secretary of Defense) to achieve the U.S. military’s desired outcomes in those strategic environments. Resources and tools are variables to carefully consider in strategy development.1 In the current political and economic environment, now more than ever, the Department of Defense (DoD) and U.S. Military Services must be flexible in force structure and resource allocation to successfully achieve strategic objectives. The following discussion addresses three areas in support of creative resource allocation that should be addressed in the future NMS; Force Planning, Budget and Acquisition Processes, and Interagency Cooperation.
Document:
-- This document was previously available on the DISAM Journal Web site which has since been decommissioned --
A Study of the Effectiveness of United States Security Assistance Training Programs in the Western Hemisphere
Submitted By:
Daniel Torres
Summary:
The US Government (USG) engages with a variety of Latin American countries by offering Security Assistance Training opportunities through International Military Education and Training programs (IMET), Foreign Military Sales (FMS), and a variety of other programs authorized by the Foreign Assistance Act (FAA) and the Arms Export Control Act (AECA). These offerings include a spectrum of training ranging from Senior Professional Military Education, to technical training, to high cost aviation flight training, and serve as a support element to bilateral relations and the fielding of equipment purchased by or granted to allied and friendly countries. This research initiative focuses on the effectiveness of training programs with Latin American countries and evaluates results in terms of the three pillars of security cooperation, which encompass all Department of Defense (DOD) interactions with a foreign defense establishment. These are to (1) build relationships that promote specific US security interests, (2) develop allied and friendly military capabilities for self-defense and multinational operations, and (3) provide US forces with peacetime and contingency access to host nation.
Document:
A Study of the Effectiveness of United States Security Assistance Training Programs in the Western Hemisphere
The Role of the Plan Colombia Helicopter Package in Strengthening the Legitimacy of the Colombian Government
Submitted By:
Mario E. Zaltzman
Summary:
This thesis seeks to address the question of the specific role of the application of the Plan Colombia Helicopter Package (PCHP) in the context of the Colombian counter insurgency strategy, through the lens of the transformation of the Colombian political and security transformation between 1999 and today, in effecting repeatable outcomes that strengthened the legitimacy of the Government of Colombia (GoC).
Document:
The Role of the Plan Colombia Helicopter Package...
Social Media, Public Opinion, and Security Cooperation in Saudi Arabia
Submitted By:
Joshua I. Cummins
Summary:
The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has been experiencing a variety of cultural and social changes over the past decade. There has been a small relaxation in some religious laws, a push for more rights for women, and even an increase in popularity of the United States. A recent study of public opinion in the Middle East over the last 10 years highlighted an interesting case in Saudi Arabia. While Saudi public opinion of the US was in 2003 among the lowest of the study, it ranked among the highest in 2012 (Cummins, 2012). This poses the questions of what has caused these changes in culture and attitudes in Saudi Arabia that have not occurred in other Middle Eastern or Arab countries and how these changes affect US Security Cooperation and overall relations with the United States.
Document:
Social Media, Public Opinion, and Security Cooperation in Saudi Arabia
Assessing Security Cooperation: Improving Methods to Maximize Effects
Submitted By:
Daniel A. Linquist
Summary:
Security cooperation professionals work towards the development of a standardized assessment framework that not only provides the most complete data for recommendation development, but also is compatible across geographic boundaries and interagency boundaries. Across the inter-agency a common language does not exist when referring to the planning and assessment process. In order to maximize the efficiency of US Government programs in security cooperation around the globe, there must be some efforts to not only improve assessment, but also to build some commonality among assessment frameworks and progress measures. This paper aims to highlight some considerations when planning and implementing security cooperation and should provide the reader with some critical-thinking tools to continue discussion with interagency partners involved in security cooperation. The paper discusses assessment based on current policy, considers strengths and weaknesses of three assessment or research methodologies, then current practices and opportunities. Finally it provides some recommendations for further academic study and discussion.
Document:
Assessing Security Cooperation: Improving Methods to Maximize Effects


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Contact Webmaster  |  Accessibility Statement  |  Privacy & Security  |  No FEAR Act  |  External Link Disclaimer  |  FOIA  |  USA.GOV

Web Related

Contact Webmaster
Accessibility Statement
Privacy & Security
No FEAR Act
External Link Disclaimer
FOIA
USA.GOV

Use of this DoD computer system, authorized or unauthorized, constitutes consent to monitoring of this system. Unauthorized use may subject you to criminal prosecution. Evidence of unauthorized use collected during monitoring may be used for administrative, criminal, or other adverse action. Use of this system constitutes consent to monitoring for these purposes.

Defense Institute of Security Cooperation Studies , 2475 K. Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433-7641, Telephone: 937-713-3300

COE Logo
DISCS is accredited by the Council on Occupational Education

This web site is DSCA PA approved

×

Commandant's Corner

Hello Security Cooperation Workforce! I do my best to update this every 90 days, but things are working so hot and heavy that I could cover ground easily doing it monthly – things are moving very quickly and these few words are only a quick snapshot!

First and foremost, we welcomed LTG Charles G. Hooper as the new DSCA Director – the 17th Director of DSCA.

In my last update, I talked about the start-up of the DISCS campus being established in the National Capital Region (NCR). Let me take this “edition” to update everyone on the milestone. I’m pleased to say that the campus was activated on 2 October 2017. We have 5 personnel currently on board, with their faculty qualification ongoing. While their primary duties will involve instruction and administration at the DISCS-NCR campus, upon certification DISCS-NCR instructors, will support broader course development as well as instruction for DISCS courses at all locations. Likewise, DISCS faculty at WPAFB will continue to support DISCS-NCR courses in both interim and long term operations. This is to help ensure that professional expertise and interaction among our faculty, DSCA headquarters personnel and representatives of organizations and agencies in the NCR remains robust.

DISCS-NCR personnel will work out of offices in DSCA headquarters until the new DISCS –NCR campus is constructed. Classes will continue to be held in the interim at rented facilities, but we anticipate classes commencing in January 2019 in the new DISCS-NCR campus on the third floor of the Crystal City Gateway Two building (CG-2) following construction slated to begin next summer (2018). This is exciting!

Work does continue on the Security Cooperation Workforce Development Program (SCWDP) effort. There is a Working Group Meeting coming up on 23-24 October in Arlington, VA with much focusing on the “Final Guidance” for the Program which is due to Congress around Christmas. That will provide much of the direction on where the Program will be headed as we move ahead. Coordination will be in the works in the next few weeks. There’s no way that I can cover a lot of the details here and won’t try. However, know that your organization very likely (if you’re reading this, should) have someone participating in the Working Group who can give you the very latest information. If you can’t find someone, please let me know and I’ll help you find them.

Finally, DISCS announced its program of course offerings for FY18 with everything now posted on our website. Thank you for bearing with us – we anticipate getting next year’s plan (for FY19) out earlier to enhance your planning calendars as well.

I’ll stop there and re-establish a goal of updating the Commandant’s Corner as often as possible to keep you informed in a more timely way in this fast-paced environment.

Sincerely,

Dr. Ron Reynolds

×

Commandant's Corner

Hello Security Cooperation Workforce! I do my best to update this every 90 days, but things are working so hot and heavy that I could cover ground easily doing it monthly – things are moving very quickly and these few words are only a quick snapshot!

First and foremost, we welcomed LTG Charles G. Hooper as the new DSCA Director – the 17th Director of DSCA.

In my last update, I talked about the start-up of the DISCS campus being established in the National Capital Region (NCR). Let me take this “edition” to update everyone on the milestone. I’m pleased to say that the campus was activated on 2 October 2017. We have 5 personnel currently on board, with their faculty qualification ongoing. While their primary duties will involve instruction and administration at the DISCS-NCR campus, upon certification DISCS-NCR instructors, will support broader course development as well as instruction for DISCS courses at all locations. Likewise, DISCS faculty at WPAFB will continue to support DISCS-NCR courses in both interim and long term operations. This is to help ensure that professional expertise and interaction among our faculty, DSCA headquarters personnel and representatives of organizations and agencies in the NCR remains robust.

DISCS-NCR personnel will work out of offices in DSCA headquarters until the new DISCS –NCR campus is constructed. Classes will continue to be held in the interim at rented facilities, but we anticipate classes commencing in January 2019 in the new DISCS-NCR campus on the third floor of the Crystal City Gateway Two building (CG-2) following construction slated to begin next summer (2018). This is exciting!

Work does continue on the Security Cooperation Workforce Development Program (SCWDP) effort. There is a Working Group Meeting coming up on 23-24 October in Arlington, VA with much focusing on the “Final Guidance” for the Program which is due to Congress around Christmas. That will provide much of the direction on where the Program will be headed as we move ahead. Coordination will be in the works in the next few weeks. There’s no way that I can cover a lot of the details here and won’t try. However, know that your organization very likely (if you’re reading this, should) have someone participating in the Working Group who can give you the very latest information. If you can’t find someone, please let me know and I’ll help you find them.

Finally, DISCS announced its program of course offerings for FY18 with everything now posted on our website. Thank you for bearing with us – we anticipate getting next year’s plan (for FY19) out earlier to enhance your planning calendars as well.

I’ll stop there and re-establish a goal of updating the Commandant’s Corner as often as possible to keep you informed in a more timely way in this fast-paced environment.

Sincerely,

Dr. Ron Reynolds